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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
broadcasting and by contribution to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, sitting in for gwen ifill this week, john dickerson of "slate magazine" and cbs news john: good evening, this week, president obama gave the first state-of-the-union address of his second term. it was packed with almost 30 different policy proposals, some, like immigration reform, were familiar. others, like his call for expanding preschool and rating colleges, were new. it was a robust vision for a president engaged in hand-to-hand combat congressional republicans over the basic exchanges of government. still, the president said the country could afford all of it. >> nothing i'm proposing tonight should increase our deficit by a single dime. it is not a bigger government we need, but a smarter government that sets priorities and invests in broad-based growth. john: , so, karen, if bill clinton kind the famous phrase that the era of big government over, did president obama launch the era of smart government? >> that's going to depend on what side of the aisle you were sitt
to receive. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: two major airlines announced a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 18
... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: two major airlines announced a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 187 million passengers who fly the two airlines annually. >> i grew up on u.s. airways. >> brown: as well as more than 100,000 employees. >> our best goal going forward is to make it the biggest, strongest airline in the country, and i suppose that's about to happen. >> brown: the combined company will keep the american name and headquarters in fort worth, texas. but it is u.s. airways c.e.o. doug parker who will run it. his counterpar
documentary "cliff-hanger" on pbs takes us behind the scenes of the fiscal cliff drama on capitol hill. let's take a look at a clip. >> these guys are going into the meeting with the president. boehner has just been humiliated by his own people with the plan "b" debacle. and he tells harry reid to go [ bleep ] himself. >> harry reid looks up and he says, what? excuse me? and boehner says it again. >> hey, listen. senator reid and i are close friends. we've got to work together. but just like any close friends, sometimes you just need to clear the air. and we did. >> i can't imagine that happening. >> oh, gee. oh, that's never happened on capitol hill before, has it, michael? >> i was talking about between us. that's okay. >> that would never happen. so michael, take us behind the scenes. here i suspect pass is going to be prologged several times in the future. >> well, exactly right. when i look forward to the state of the union address tomorrow night, i'm looking forward to seeing john boehner and joe biden sitting behind barack obama, especially after what i learned in the last six months
the democratic party, cnn, cbs, pbs, a few other outlets. i think it was really shocking that leon panetta testified that there were over 200 credible security threats for 9/11, right. he said it wasn't just benghazi. there were all these other possible threats. cairo embassy was on fire, being overrun. but not -- he said not only was no one scrambled to go to benghazi's rescue, no one was ready to be scrambled. there was no sufficient resources in the area for a thousand miles, panetta says. if you've got these warnings as dempsey said they knew about the cable that was sent to hillary clinton saying benghazi's not defensible. they knew about the 200 threats. why wasn't there a plane ready to be scrambled for an intervention in the first place? it's a very strange oversight that no one teams t seems to be particularly outraged. >> you heard panetta say you can't fly in f-16s and bomb the heck out of a place. you can use it psych ljl psychoy and fly it over the compound. they're very intimidating. >> no question. at the very least they could have been used to disperse the crowds. you hear
, and welcome to this "pbs newshour" special coverage of president obama's "state of the union" address. we want you to know this program is also being livestreamed on our home page on the web. in just a few moments, the president will spell out his policy agenda for the start of his second term. he is expected tonight to focus mainly on jobs and the economy, and to highlight other domestic priorities including gun control and immigration reform, but also to touch on international challenges. here with me, as they will be throughout our coverage tonight, are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, what is different about a state of the union when it's the first one of a second term? >> you don't have that many more to look forward to? the sand is running out of the glass. this is probably the best shot that most presidents have in their second term is that first year-and-a-half before you get into congressional elections and the lame duckness really sets in. the race to succeed him begins while he's just sitting there. so this is important. this is th
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org i was sitting there in tears in my living room watching it. we learned the truth about america. ed asner: white actors were willing to break each other's legs to be in the show. i mean, these novels were just the best stuff ever. i do love you, meggie. i always will. and i found myself in the biggest melodrama of all time. the saga of an american family. now, you listen to old fiddler if you wants to keep alive. you in america now. but i think the responsibility of television is to lift up its audience, intellectually, spiritually, and emotionally. is to lift up its audience, intellectually, through programs like this, made available for everyone through contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. seacrest: they captured audiences like nothing before. "rich man, poor man," "roots," "thorn birds." look at the size of those audiences. they poured huge amounts of money
and of course i'll have the weekend. >> what is the weekend? (laughter) >> that was a clip from pbs's "downton abbey." british tv series that depicts the lives of an n aristocratic family and their servants and almost as popular as american idol is here and abroad. despite the fact that it makes rich people look good and not evil, stu varney says that's the opposite message of the one we have been getting from some of our elected leaders here at home. stu varney host of varney and company at the fox business network. you see a political message here and you're not the only one. many on the left particularly in great britain have been ripping the show suggesting the creator julian fellow hes is in their view conservative and to the right and more fair-minded people say he's a center right, not far right, but in any event they say -- they accused him of having an agenda of making the rich look good and that's why they hate "downton abbey" and you say what. >> what other tv show have you ever seen, a modern tv show, where the rich are made to look generous, honest, classy, and looking after peopl
couldn't deny them intellectually. so i adopted them. >> all right. that was a clip from the pbs documentary "makers: women who make america. a film about the evolution of women's roles over the past 50 years. with us, the mother/daughter pair featured in the film, founding editor of "ms." magazine, letty pogrebin and writer abby pogrebin. thanks for being here again. >> thanks for having us. >> i look at that clip, and it's a generational thing. what was radical when you did that was actually pretty normal by the time i grew up. i'd see my dad sitting on the couch and go, can you get me a sandwich? everybody would turn to him and say, get it yourself! it wasn't that way. >> it was very radical at the time. i was working full time. so was he. yet i would come home and bake bread in order to make stuffing for the turkey. >> you didn't even think twice about it, did you? >> no. it just was some role i was born into. and when i became a feminist, i read myself into radicalism. i suddenly looked around and said, this is ridiculous. i can't justify it. and so my husband and i used to
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)